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‘Squad’ Democrat Cori Bush slammed over civil rights icon comments: ‘You are no Rosa Parks’

"Squad" member Cori Bush got some pushback this weekend for her comments that invoked the memory of Rosa Parks on the anniversary of her famous arrest.

Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., got some pushback online this weekend for her comments that invoked the memory of Rosa Parks on the anniversary of her famous arrest. 

A Friday tweet from the “Squad” member, included a quote from Parks, commenting on her famous refusal to give up her bus seat on Dec. 1, 1955 and her subsequent arrest that invigorated the Civil Rights movement

“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true…No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in,” read the quote. 


“68 years ago, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus,” Bush tweeted. “We must continue to refuse to give in, in our fight for liberation.” 

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The comments were met with criticism from many who distinguished contemporary America and the America of the 1950s. 

Many questioned what rights Bush did not have. Others argued Bush’s time would be better served dealing with “today problems for all your constituents.” 

“Respectfully, you are no Rosa Parks,” another X user wrote. Another user simply dismissed her comments as “quality gibberish.”

Fox News Digital has reached out to Bush’s office for a response. 

An African-American seamstress and local activist, Parks was 42 when she refused to give up her seat to a White passenger on a Montgomery, Alabama public bus on Dec. 1, 1955. 

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At the time, Black bus riders were required to sit in the back of the bus and give up their seats to White riders if the front seats were filled, per a local Montgomery ordinance

Rosa Parks’ quiet yet heroic act of defiance landed her in jail and she was later released on $100 bond. The firestorm of action and attention that followed her one-woman protest reshaped American history. 

The U.S. Supreme Court deemed Montgomery’s segregationist policies unconstitutional on Nov. 13, 1956. 

Fox News’ Kerry J. Byrne contributed to this report.

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