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Hillary Clinton Issues Ultimatum: Preserve the Filibuster or Minority Voting Rights: ‘We Can’t Do Both’

Twice failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton issued an ultimatum Thursday, contending Congress must choose between preserving the filibuster or protecting voting rights for minorities. But doing both, she suggested, is an impossibility.

“We can preserve the filibuster, or we can preserve the voting rights of people of color. But we can’t do both,” Clinton said, providing a CNN graphic of the United States which identified bills “aiming to curb voting rights introduced in almost every state”:

Clinton’s remark follows a wave of leftist rage stemming from Georgia’s recently signed election integrity law, which, despite popular belief, expands voting in some areas:

Members of the radical left quickly dismissed the legislation as suppressive, prompting Major League Baseball’s (MLB) decision to pull its All-Star Game and draft from Atlanta, a city with a sizeable minority population.

According to Fox Business Network’s Charles Gasparino, Commissioner Rob Manfred opted to pull the events from the state after speaking with failed Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, a point of interest given Abrams’ aversion to the early boycotts of the Peach State:

Notably, the MLB moved the events to Colorado, which has fewer early voting days than Georgia, as well as ID requirements. Nevertheless, Democrats have continued to falsely describe the Peach State law as suppressive, even though poll after poll shows a majority of likely voters, including black and Latino voters, support basic election integrity measures such as voter ID.

All the while, Democrats have continued to push for the end of the filibuster as a means to advance their radical agenda items.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki went as far as describing the filibuster as “allowing for systematic racism in the country,” even though President Biden defended the filibuster in 2005.

Story cited here.

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