Uncategorized

Governor who clashed with Obama over attempted illegal immigration crackdown reacts to SCOTUS’ Texas ruling

Former Republican Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer celebrated the Supreme Court's stay of Texas' tough immigration law, similar to one she implemented during her first term.

FIRST ON FOX: A former Republican governor widely known for her clashes with the Obama administration while attempting to crack down on illegal immigration in her state reacted to the Supreme Court’s ruling on Tuesday that Texas can enforce a law that allows local police to arrest migrants suspected of crossing the border illegally. 

Speaking with Fox News Digital immediately following the ruling, former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer celebrated what she said was the court “finally realizing” it’s OK with the aspects of a law similar to one her state implemented in 2010 that was later partially struck down after drawing international attention for its tough approach to illegal immigration.

“I’m happy to hear that they finally realized they’re OK with S.B. 1070. We felt that at the time when it was passed, and we had a lot of legal scholars that agreed,” Brewer told Fox, referencing the Arizona law. “And now we’ve got some principled Supreme Court justices that made the right decision. And I think that we all understand clearly that we have a right to arrest illegal people in our state. They’re breaking the law.”


SCOTUS OKAYS LAW LETTING TEXAS POLICE ARREST MIGRANTS SUSPECTED OF ILLEGALLY CROSSING BORDER

The Supreme Court struck down parts of S.B. 1070 in 2012, including a provision that would have allowed police to make arrests for violations of federal immigration law. S.B. 4 — Texas’ version of the Arizona bill — was similarly struck down by a federal judge in February, but was stayed by the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals before reaching the Supreme Court. 

See also  Biden hosts Czech leader at White House to promote Ukraine aid amid holdup in Congress

The court did not explain its reasoning for ending the 5th Circuit Court’s stay, but the ruling appeared to be focused less on the merits of the case rather than the stay itself. In a concurring opinion, Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Brett Kavanaugh expressed concern about the moves by the appeals court — and suggested it could rule differently on the law’s merits.

When asked about the potential permanence of the law, given a possible future Supreme Court ruling, and whether that might encourage other states to pass similar laws, Brewer predicted that states beyond just those at the border would be inclined to because of the spread of migrants across the country.

TOP DEMOCRAT IN TIGHT SENATE RACE BACKS CITIZENSHIP, VOTING RIGHTS FOR MILLIONS OF ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

“The problem is so vast now that it’s all over. I mean, it’s everywhere. In the Midwest — it’s everywhere. So I think, yeah, they’ll strongly look into it because they want to protect their communities, and their cities, and their counties, and their people,” Brewer said. 

“It just makes sense. Just because you’re illegal, doesn’t make it OK. I don’t know why it’s so difficult for people to understand. I mean, they are breaking the law. Why do we let them get away with that?” she added.

Brewer predicted the ongoing border crisis would encourage people across the country to get out and vote, considering voters have consistently said the issue remains one of their top concerns.

See also  Georgia man sentenced 30 years after 'horrific' beating of his 2 toddlers for messy bedroom

Fox News’ Adam Shaw, Bradford Betz, Brianna Herlihy and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Share this article:
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter

→ What are your thoughts? ←
Scroll down to leave a comment: