Inflation Lifestyle News Opinons

Bill Gates Buys Massive Amount of Farmland in North Dakota, But the State AG Just Stepped in


Bill Gates has made himself the single largest private owner of farmland in the United States.

The globalist billionaire expanded his holdings of American farmland, accumulating a total of 242,000 acres of the most arable land in America, according to The Daily Caller.

North Dakota’s attorney general is stepping in after Gates’ trust acquired six parcels of land in Pembina County.


Attorney General Drew Wrigley sent a Tuesday letter to the trust, demanding answers on how he intends to use (or hoard) the land he purchased in the state.

North Dakota law restricts the ownership and leasing of farmland to corporations and limited liability companies. In addition, there are certain limitations with regard to trusts.

If Gates’ trust is unable to demonstrate that it’s using the land in accordance with state law, he could face fines of $100,000 unless the trust divests from the land within one year.

Some of Gates’ public remarks suggest a dark motive for his hoarding of American farmland.

See also  Biden’s Economy Sees Worst First Half for Stocks Since 1872

Gates has urged developed nations such as the United States to replace real meat with a synthetic laboratory-made replacement.

“You can get used to the taste difference, and the claim is they’re going to make it taste even better over time,” the Microsoft founder argued in an interview with the MIT Technology Review, according to The Western Journal.

Gates’ position as the single largest owner of American farmland puts him in a unique position to potentially harm ranchers and cattlemen.

The billionaire could prevent ranchers from grazing their cows on his extensive property, cutting them off from land they’ve used for decades.

This would significantly increase supply pressures on ranchers, and ultimately raise the price of beef at the supermarkets.

The billionaire could prevent ranchers from grazing their cows on his extensive property, cutting them off from land they’ve used for decades.

This would significantly increase supply pressures on ranchers, and ultimately raise the price of beef at the supermarkets.

Story cited here.

→ What are your thoughts? ←
Scroll down to leave a comment: